AIGA GAIN: Redesigning Commerce / Funding to the Pitch

Is your idea best suited for seed and angel funding, or should you launch on Indiegogo first?

What about the values of bootstrapping?

What’s a social venture, and if you think you have one, are you better structured as a for-profit, or not-for-profit, or B-Corp?

Or, perhaps your freelance design practice is ready to scale—what kind of structure works best, and when is fundraising appropriate?

How you choose to launch will determine your destiny.

And if you’re founding an organization, you’ll spend much of your time fundraising—and fundraising can be fun. 

Thanks all that attended the professional development workshop at AIGA’s GAIN conference – Redesigning Commerce – Fundraising.

 

 

The Transformative Power of Open Data

Repost from the Economics and Statistics Administration:

New York City – Under Secretary Mark Doms participated in a high level data discussion this morning at the Strata+Hadoop World Conference in New York City. Before an audience of 500 leading technologists and data programmers, Under Secretary Doms talked with host Jennifer van der Meer, Adjunct Professor at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program and CEO of Reason Street, to explore the Department of Commerce’s strategic data plan and Doms’ efforts to move the federal statistical system into the era of big data.

2nycstrata_hadoop_world

Doms noted that the US Department of Commerce has long been a powerhouse for government data, trailblazing the use of government statistics and analysis to help everyone make more informed decisions. Now, in the era of big data, with large volumes of data collected and analyzed by the private sector, by citizens themselves, the agency, with Doms leadership, is working to position itself as a leader in the federal data space. Jennifer van der Meer asked the Under Secretary about Commerce’s plans to hire its first Chief Data Officer, stand up a Data Advisory Council populated with private sector and academic data leaders, and ways the Department is looking to team with the private sector to better collect, disseminate, and analyze Commerce data.

Doms went on to highlight the fact that challenges facing companies and our society often do not fit neatly in the “buckets” represented by the various federal agencies. Commerce has data that, say, could be meshed with Department of Education data, to tackle our nation’s skills gap or help students determine which majors have the best return on investment. Doms noted Commerce’s involvement with the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy and their efforts to coordinate interagency discussion to share best practices and tackle cross-agency challenges. Doms pointed out this coordination is critical to unleashing the positive benefits of federal data, with the next step being to figure out how to incorporate private datasets and get greater corporate buy-in to the open data movement currently underway at the federal, state and local level.

Under Secretary Doms closed out the discussion by making the case that the federal government must remain a leader in data. Like our basic scientific research, the building and maintaining of our nation’s highways and water treatment facilities, and rural postal delivery, providing comprehensive data on our people, economy and the planet will continue to be a core federal mission. This information is critical to decision making by every business, government, and citizen, and the private sector simply does not have the financial incentive to fill this role. Doms thanked Jennifer and the audience for a lively discussion, one that further informed his efforts, under Secretary Pritzker’s leadership, to revolutionize data at the Department of Commerce.

Government Stats at Strata Hadoop

Tomorrow I look forward to a fireside chat conversation with Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs Mark Doms at Strata Hadoop’s Data Driven Business Day.

Government Statistics in the Era of Big Data
Mark Doms (United States Department of Commerce), Jen van der Meer (Reason Street)
9:25am Wednesday, 10/15/2014
Data-Driven Business Day

Location: E 20/ E 21

The US Department of Commerce has long been the powerhouse of government data, trailblazing the use of government statistics and analysis for all of us to make more informed decisions. Now that the era of big data is upon us, with large volumes of data collected and analyzed by the private sector, by citizens themselves, and sensors, how is the agency adapting to this new data environment? During this conversation with Dr. Mark Doms, the Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs for the Department of Commerce, we will discuss the value of data in the economy at a macro level and how data collection, aggregation and analysis methods are adapting in response to technological change. What does this mean for you and your company? Come to this fireside chat at Data Driven Business Day to learn more.

And on PR Newswire.

 

 

Bodies and Buildings Class 5: Ebola outbreak, the power to change the rules

The past two weeks in class we spent time first paying attention to the Ebola crisis, then trying to map out the system as we understand it.

While much of health technology has come to focus on in hospital systems, electronic health records, and chronic disease management, we wanted to see what we could envision for an acute and rapidly growing outbreak.

Students presented ideas for what to do about the crisis using their skills as creative technologists at ITP. It was a humbling reminder of how hard it is to be helpful when the core underlying technologies are not present – available internet, handheld devices.

Here are two sources students found that were hard to read and watch but gave more context than TV news sources:

VICE News: Monrovia in Chaos

WSJ: For Want of Gloves Doctors Die

We then shifted to talk about the power to change the rules in a system, and began the shift to “buildings” and how a much the less threatening but still pervasive problem of sick building syndrome was addressed through rule changes.

For midterms, students will write an OpEd – considering the format as if it were an interaction design to get you to do something, or change your mind.