Biofabricate

Looking forward to the multiple disciplines being convened at the Biofabricate conference – and the chance to thread environment impact assessment, health impact, startup ethics, and the precautionary principle.

‘BIOFABRICATE’ is the world’s first summit dedicated to biofabrication for future industrial and consumer products. Biofabrication comprises highly disruptive technologies enabling design and manufacturing to intersect with the building blocks of life. Computers can now read and write with DNA. This is a world where bacteria, yeast, fungi, algae and mammalian cells grow and shape sustainable new materials.

My slides are here:

 

Lean at ITP Spring 2015

Apply as a team, launch an MVP in one semester.

NYU ITP is offering for the second time a for-credit Lean class designed to get your team to a minimum viable product launch within one semester. This course is open to all enrolled NYU students, and you are invited to join a team or submit a team for consideration. We embrace a creative, iterative, and collaborative approach to making things: software, hardware, and things in between.

Our method: we offer equal parts Lean Startup/Lean LaunchPad methodology, with a hands-on approach to learning user experience design (even if you have only sketched wireframes in your mind before taking the class). We have re-designed the course for Spring 2015 to get you to value proposition fit by the end of the semester. The course is taught by adjuncts Josh Knolwes and Jen van der Meer, and is supported by a tremendous network of mentors and advisors who are actively involved in the class.

2014 Syllabus

2014 Mentors and Advisors

Course text: Business Model Generation

How to apply:

Come to the Lean at ITP Team Building Info Session:

Saturday, November 15, 2015 at 3:00

We’ll introduce you to likeminded entrepreneurial teams who are forming to apply for the course, and give you an overview of the lean method as it has been adapted for ITP, and the mentors, and advisors signing up for the spring semester. We recommend team members with core skills of entrepreneurship and making including design, code/engineering, ethnography, and customer development/networking.  Come if you are an individual looking to join a team, or you have a fully developed team and are curious about how the course will be structured.

Apply as a Team by December 5, 2015

Requirements:

  •      An initial concept, well articulated
  •      At least three team members
  •      At least one team member with “making” skills – design, code, engineering, hardware (related to the concept)

Remember to Sign up for the NOVEMBER 15TH Info Session (Required):  http://lean-in-at-itp-info-session.eventbrite.com

Team Interview Day for consideration: Scheduled before December 19, 2015

Teams will be invited to present concepts and participate in an interview with the course instructors and mentors. We will curate a mix of concepts and teams for maximum diversity of ideas, skills, and collaborative team member experiences.

Contact Jen van der Meer – jd1159@nyu.edu to for questions about how to apply, or watch for updates on the class blog.

 

Bodies and Buildings: Paradigms, Anti-Oedipus, and Passive House November 3 2014

Last class we did a quick tour of Paradigm Shifts, Deleuze and Guattari, and Passive House vs. LEED.

Anti-Oedipus: A Thousand Plateaus. Capitalism and Schizophrenia.

We looked at Deleuze and Guattari as an exercise in mindset shift – there is nothing like Anti-Oedipus in the hands of a global group of makers who can manufacture their own means of communication and production.

It’s freeing to talk of Rhizomes and Assemblages vs. Arboreal thinking with students who naturally think and work this way, and who have no formal history with cirtical theory, Freud, Lacan, Marx, or even Oedipus, and how these concepts have shaped hierarchies of thought.

Haven’t heard of Delueze, Guttari? Skip it all, go to the French version of A Thousand Plateuas and play Marc Ngui’s images in the background as you sip Yerba Matte tea.

Paradigm shifts: always remember Dana Meadows’ wise counsel – the strongest leverage points are mindset and paradigm shifts. We spend our time tinkering with the measures, the metrics, the goals – but to see a better world we need to level up.

This lesson about mindshifts/paradigms is not yet learned in health, education, and building construction.

With architecture and buildings, we’ve recently witnessed the rise of LEED standards, with all of their metrics and platinum, gold and silver badges.

I shared what it was like to celebrate the very idea of the Bank of America tower which was supposed to generate more energy than it took from the grid. The tower won Platinum status, NYSERDA money back for energy savings, and praise from Al Gore. But in 2012, when asked to report their actual energy usage, The Bank of America tower was a mega fail. According to data released by New York City in 2012 (source NY Times partially restricted paywall), the Bank of America Tower produces more greenhouse gases and uses more energy per square foot than any comparably sized office building in Manhattan. It uses more than twice as much energy per square foot as the 80-year-old Empire State Building.

The USGBC, which operates LEED, similarly says it has no control over how the buildings it certifies are used. But LEED certifies new buildings before they are even occupied, basing its ratings on computer models that often end up overestimating a building’s performance. If you can model, you can’t necessarily manage.

The good news is the rapid rise of the Passive House movement, which shifts our mindset about the purpose of green construction. If the first wave of green was about bamboo flooring in giants homes with three car garages, then passive house is about economy in construction and operation, and the goal of the system: climate comfort for the humans inside.

When constructing a passive house, an architect and engineer can model the intended energy benefits. But it is not until the building is built and meets air and energy criteria that a building can be called Passive House. We are valuing measured energy (Passive House) over modeled energy (LEED).

We will take the advice of the late paradigm changing coach, Dana Meadows, paraphrasing Thomas Kuhn the paradigm historian:

You keep pointing at the anomalies and failures in the old paradigm, you keep speaking louder and with assurance from the new one, you insert people with the new paradigm in places of public visibility and power.

You don’t waste time with reactionaries; rather you work with active change agents and with the vast middle group of people who are open minded.

Homework next week:

1. Pick any one of the “Facsicles” from ArtFarm on architecture theory:
http://www.archfarm.org/en/ and build a system diagram about what you learn.

2. Start thinking about the final: What part of the system of how we make and maintain our buildings, interests you the most?
What are the anomalies and failures that irk you?
What possibilities do you see?

3. Extra credit: see a passive house this weekend somewhere in NY.