Lean at ITP Workshop 2016

Changing to a workshop format this year to scale it up!

What: Lean @ ITP
When: Two weeks in January, 11-22
Location: NYU ITP 421 Waverly 4th Floor

Lean ITP

We embrace a creative, iterative, and collaborative approach to making things — but launching a product out into the world takes a somewhat different set of skills. How does one make sure people want to use what they make? How does one figure out how to support an idea with the right business structure? Is the idea strong enough to turn into a job — or a career? Enter Lean at NYU ITP – the experiential workshop in entrepreneurship.  (Please note:  this is a non-credit opportunity, it does not provide degree credit toward the ITP degree).

Who is this for: any student who wants to pursue a path to entrepreneurship, or work in an entrepreneurial company.

Format: 2 intense but fun-filled weeks in January with daily 1.5 hour orientation sessions and feedback each day, followed by outside in field ethnography and customer research.

Fee: Cost for the workshop: $200. Student fees will be pooled into a prototyping and marketing experiment fund – to run those first critical tests on the path to user growth and revenue. The fund will be made available to those student teams that show focus, commitment, and progress towards understanding their customer.

Modeled after Steve Blank’s Lean LaunchPad and the NYU Summer
LaunchPad Accelerator, we are applying the curriculum developed at
Stanford and Berkeley for the NYU community. This workshop has been
developed with support from the NYU Entrepreneurship Initiative, and
aims at mixing the best of the methods from the Lean LaunchPad
methodology with the spirit of ITP’s emphasis on exploring the
imaginative use of technology to augment people’s lives.Over a two week program in January, student teams participate in an
iterative approach to startup development, a combination of customer
development + business model design + personal exploration to
determine the most viable business scenario for their ideas. Alexander
Osterwalder’s Business Model Generation is used as the basic framework
for business model development, and we utilize interaction design
methods and tools to ground students in an understanding of how to
successfully move through the early generative stages of product
development.We will facilitate and organize student teams of 3-4 to develop the
company concept and business model over the two week course. The
primary focus of the course is the work of customer development,
speaking directly to potential customer to help define opportunities
that the startup is designed to solve, and early stage product
development. The ITP curriculum will augment the Lean method with
additional approaches from generative design, UX, and ethnography to
accelerate the understanding of both explicit pain points and more
latent or hidden challenges that people face, in their jobs and their
lives.

Participants from the NYC Venture Capital community and leading
successful startup entrepreneurs will serve as mentors and advisors to
student teams. The workshop is open to all enrolled NYU students.

Please indicate interest by signing up here (official registration to follow)

or email Jen van der Meer at jd1159 at nyu dot edu with questions.

Finding Your Customer Pain Points: How Far Do You Go

faces

One of the first jobs in unlocking a business model is to define a customer segment, and figure out customer “pain points.” You know you’ve struck gold when you uncover a “hair on fire” problem that is so tremendously painful the customer will work with your earliest version of the product just to douse the flames.

The belief about pain points is reinforced by investors, incubators, accelerators, and entrepreneurship curricula like Lean LaunchPad. I teach a version of Lean at NYU ITP, and like all good entrepreneur coaches, I too encourage founders to get out of the building, discover customers, and find the pain points that need to be solved.

The easiest shortcut is to “scratch your own itch” – solve a problem that you, the founder have. You’re an “n of one,” or sample size of one, and your job then is simply to make sure that you’re not the only one with that problem – that you’ve found a pain point that if solved would form into a nice exponential growth curve for your company.

The challenge with the scratch / itch formula is that founders who skew younger, and male, tend to go for the superficial itch and not the deeper underlying pain points. Entrepreneurs seem to be stuck in a logic error that never satisfies our need for time, love, food, or money. For our own lives, and the lives of the people we are trying to serve.

There’s been a call recently to encourage for profit, growth seeking startups to tackle the “real problems” that face our culture – but we seem trapped in a circular logic that keeps us stuck in superficial, temporary needs.

How do we get to big ideas when so many founders are encouraged to simply solve for the known, obvious pain points. And how do you find any competitive advantage when solving for the known knowns?

Defining customer needs, it turns out, is an art, and a science. Pursuing hypotheses through customer interviews is a great way to validate early thinking and save precious time ensuring that there is an actual market need a solution. But how you go about conducting interviews, what do you ask? How and when do you talk about your solution? When do you stop searching for the pain, and how do you prioritize that first list of features to launch your idea?

We’ll be conducting a series of online courses at Reason Street to explore the art and science of customer fit. If you’re interested in learning how to get underneath the obvious truths, and find out how to position your business to solve deeper human needs, sign up for our upcoming class, with an A/B tested title that seems to fit your real pain points about business models:

Screen Shot 2015-11-04 at 3.35.49 PM

 

 

Why Growth? Pitchfest Workshops at New Inc.

What’s more fun than working with a bunch of world changing tech founders who see themselves as future unicorns?

Working with artist entrepreneurs at New Inc.

In module 1 of a Pitchfest Workshop series, we covered why you might want to grow big, and have huge scale, as an exercise in imagining your impact.

We are here:  Module 1: Why Growth

Module 2: Storyline (and business model help)

Module 3: Pitch Practice, Feedback, Development

Pitchfest will help you create a growth narrative for your company. The goal of the workshop: construct your company narrative to get useful and constructive feedback from growth investors. We’re focused on the shortest story, the “short deck.” You’ll need a longer deck if you are actually pursuing investors.

You may decide to pursue a fast growth model, or you may decide to pursue more of a steady state plan for generating revenue – but at least you will have invested time to understand the potential for your business.

Prework: Make sure you have recently spoken to at least 10 potential customers before coming to the Pitchfest to present your idea.

Pitch Practice: 2 minutes each, no visual aids.

Why Growth?

Impact. Scale. Envisioning Big Outcomes. If it is clear enough and compelling enough AND BIG ENOUGH it will attract the SCALE AND IMPACT-SEEKING people and resources (VCs, angels, future partners and team members)

What does it mean to seek a 10x return?

My current revenues of _______ would have to grow to ____________ in 5 years to be considered worthy of a venture capital investment.

Trick question – why?

Angel Targeted Returns 5 to 10 times $ in 4 to 8 years

Multiple
 

 

Years to Exit

5x 6x 7x 8x 9x 10x
4 50% 57% 64 68 73% 78%
5 38% 43 48 55 55 58%
6 31% 35 38 44 66 47%
7 26% 29 32 37 37 39%
8 25% 25 28 30 32 33%

For some early angels in Facebook, returns = 62,000%

What % of startups fail? ___________

Why Not Growth?
Control. Creative Control. Ownership Stake. Lifestyle.

Smaller market size – but compelling.

Rich vs. King.

Trade-Off by Noam Wasserman at HBR.org

The Founder’s Dilemma at HBR.org.

 

Prep for Next Time:

Purpose. Know why you are driven to do this.

Motivation. Know what drives you? Are you trying to control your own destiny? Or dominate the world? Create a dent in the universe?

Further orientation:

Spend time going over VC classic recommendations for how to build a pitch deck:

Sequoia Cooley Co Polaris New York Angels Criteria

For lots of examples PitchEnvy The exact Pitch Strategy I’ve used to Raise $125 MM since 2011.

1. Choose a story line arc.
Module 2 is storyline for the pitch – covering the personal motivation/inspiration to start the company, the current market need, the vision for growth, the potential financial outcome.
If you haven’t seen Kurt Vonnegut’s failed master’s thesis – he outlines the different storylines perfectly. For a startup pitch – the Creation/Cinderella arc works well, but also consider the “Man in Hole” storyline – more room to be compelling if you had a story of struggle. No Kafka!
Vonnegut on Open Culture.
2. Assemble any unknown data for your pitch.
Here are examples of VC recommendations for pitches – you don’t have to follow these but they are showing you what investors tend to look for. Not all investors are the same – and in a first meeting you are better off intriguing them than you are having every question answered.
What you’ll need in your story –
_You, your origin/background story, your motivation. (Spear in the chest moment).
_The huge, pressing problem that people are suffering from today.
_The size of that first market – your customer segment / target / nice.
_How big the market could be eventually.
_Your extraordinary solution.
_Your secret sauce.
(And have as backup competitive difference, financial projections, and business model hypotheses for how this idea will make an investor a 10x+ return in 5 years).
3. Create your storyline for a verbal 1-2 minute pitch.
We’re practicing for demo day – but this is the pitch you would make before you start showing the demo, or along side the demo. But I recommend developing a pitch that would work with just your words, so that you’ll be able to make a compelling intro to your business anywhere, in any circumstance.
You don’t seem like a shy crowd so just jump in, it will be fun and we an workshop any questions next week.